Glenfiddich Fire & Cane

Thanks to /u/the_muskox for sharing this dram.

I continue along with my series of Glenfiddich reviews that I’m doing to make up room, as it’s been too long to do these, and I have a few of them.

As the whisky I had before this one was Peated, I needed to pick out a similarly peated whisky. Once you pass the peat barrier, you can’t go back for reviews, and I only have so many calories to eat per day. Or in this case drink.

Thus I had another peated Glenfiddich, and it was time to drink peated Glenfiddich, or as it’s called, Glenfiddich Fire & Cane. This is the fourth in the Experimental series, or as I call it, the interesting releases.

What happened with this one? They took peated Glenfiddich, this time not lightly peated, and finished it in Latin rum casks. Which Latin country? No idea. I know that William Grant owns Sailor Jerry, for instance, but that’s from the Virgin Islands, which is part of the US. Which is as far from a Latin country as I think one can get, with the exception of Russia maybe.

I do know that Balvenie specifically makes its own rum to specially season Balvenie Caribbean Cask, so perhaps it’s similar to that. Rum casks can be in rough shape, as some countries reuse barrels over and over. Why? Logistics, best way to make money, poorer countries, less impact on rum vs. whisky, etc. It’d be very hard to paint with a broad brush to all Latin countries, as they all have different histories, cultures, and overall impact of colonialism upon each.

So we don’t know what the rum will be doing, and we do know the rum is gone (otherwise putting the whisky in the cask would go against the rules), but how does the peated whisky rum cask taste? Let’s see, shall we?

Price: $57

Region: Speyside

Cask type: Matured in ex-Bourbon barrels, finished in Latin Rum Casks

Abv: 43%

Colour: 5Y 7/6

Nose: Dates, brown sugar, pear, hazelnut, smoke

Yeah, that’s a rum cask. And frankly a good one, for once, or at least one that isn’t so thin you can see through it if your hands are greasy. Which makes me feel better.

Also, upon coming off of a lightly peated Glenfiddich, this one has enough peat that the smoke is evident. Unfortunately it’s not aged long enough to start getting interesting aspects from the peat. On the other hand, all of the idiots who complain when I don’t mention smoke should be happy.

Taste: Smoke, apple, brown sugar, cinnamon

More smoke (happy idiots), more rum impact (molasses/brown sugar aspects), and it’s Glenfiddich (apple). It’s literally an obvious sum of its parts. If you were told the description, you’ll have an idea of what it is. We’re not talking about hard concepts here.

Finish: Apple, smoke, cinnamon hearts, grassy

More cinnamon, less sweet, and grassier. So it’s more Glenfiddich at the end, same amount of peat, and more spice from what I presume was the rum cask. Again, nice to sip on, nothing insane.

Conclusion: Clean, light, fruity, and good smoke flavours. Good daily drinker. Makes sense they made this. It’s more peated whisky. It’s a rum cask, and whisky nerds will keep trying rum casks just like the West keeps trying trickle down economics and is surprised when we get fucked again.

I can frankly say that the rum cask this time didn’t screw me, so I guess this is… damn, I don’t really know what the equivalent to that is. Dunkaroos? Did voodoo economics cause them? Let’s go with that. This is the Dunkaroos of rum casks.

Look, it’s not a weak cask, there’s actual rum elements, the peat is decent, and it’s not stupid expensive. It’s an easy pick up if you’re starting out, or if you like peat, or if you like rum casks, or if you want to see what else Glenfiddich can do. Try it if you get the chance.

75/100

Scotch review #1554, Speyside review #442, Whisky Network review #2275

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